UNCOMMON & UNSTOPPABLE: CHANNELING THE FOUR ATTITUDES OF GRIT AND GRACE Jun16

UNCOMMON & UNSTOPPABLE: CHANNELING THE FOUR ATTITUDES OF GRIT AND GRACE...

This blog series has been about developing emotional resiliency—the internal firepower that instantly pops you back up to your feet no matter how many times you get knocked down. We have explored emotional awareness, how to detect and transmute negative emotional energy into a positive correlate, and discussed at length the four demons of anger, anxiety, arrogance and absence of self-respect. I would like to close out this series of articles by discussing the four positive attitudes of grit. Grit is like a metallurgical alloy combining emotional resiliency and emotional strength, the rarest of metals that U.S. Navy research identified as the defining quality between the .04% who are the last men standing in the graduation of a BUD/S class. If you have a burning desire live an uncommon life, the four attitudes of grit are mission critical. Burn these four traits into your character and you will find grace in the most trying of circumstances.   The Four Attitudes of Grit Self-esteem. This is the first attitude of grit. Self-esteem is the emotional state of feeling worthy and respected by others, the polar opposite of the fourth demon mentioned in the last post. As discussed, low self-esteem can originate from early traumatic experiences like childhood abandonment and similar volatile environments where your voice is not heard. Or it can be an unfortunate case of outright abuse. In any case this needs to be tackled head on and replaced with a healthy sense of self that will provide a foundation for internal resiliency. With this foundation secured, the inevitable blows of life will simply roll off of you because you will find your internal sense of worth unaffected. The stoic within comes to the battle, turning adversity into opportunity and challenges into learning. The...

Solving The Post-Workout Puzzle – Part 1...

When I first began pushing iron, I knew very little about the science of weight training and nutrition. And to be honest, I really didn’t care much about the science part. You see, I was 18 years old. At that age, all I personally cared about was being big, strong, and intimidating. Oh, and I’d better not forget to mention that I also cared a lot about sex. Somehow I figured that the pursuit of raw, intimidating “manliness” would ultimately equate to getting chicks. So most of my mental reserves were directed at getting really big and kicking everyone’s ass both in and out of the gym. Since my brain was pretty much occupied with all those deep philosophical musings, you can probably imagine that there wasn’t much room in my melon for scientific thought. That was compounded with the fact that my predominant science experiences had been with Mr. Richard Wack, the very nerdy, defeated high-school chemistry teacher that had us mixing oil and water to illustrate chemical bonding or lack thereof (I swear that was his name!). At the time, as ignorant as I was to science, there were a few scientifically validated nuggets of wisdom floating around the local gym. Sure, if I’d have known they were “science,” I probably would have ignored them entirely. But since these pieces of science were cleverly disguised and because all the big guys were talking about them, I tried to use this information to it’s fullest. We discussed the merits of statements like “eating a lot of extra protein will make you grow” and “sleeping 8 hours a night will help you recover.” These statements seemed to be entirely true and backed up by countless gym experiences. Today, they also happen to be backed...

How to Lift Forever: 5 Mandatory Exercises Jun04

How to Lift Forever: 5 Mandatory Exercises...

Here’s what you need to know… Do face-pulls to correct your posture and keep yourself from hunching over. Use the rear-foot elevated split squat to strengthen the lower body and jack up the load without harming your spine. Program loaded carries into your training with progressive overload. They’ll strengthen the entire body including the core, shoulders, and hips. The glute bridge won’t just make your butt look better, it’ll also protect the lower spine. Squats and deadlifts don’t have to be done with a barbell in order to be effective. Add these movements into your regimen for training longevity. How to Lift Forever Love lifting? Love playing sports? Then you need to make certain exercises a priority in your training to prevent injury and insure lifelong orthopedic health. Why? Partly because your posture sucks. You sit a lot and you stare at a lot of screens. The exercises below will straighten you out. The second problem is the ratio of pulling to pushing exercises. Generally speaking, most lifters push more than they pull, leading to a host of potential problems down the road. So the first step is to get your training program rebalanced. To do this, use a 2:1 ratio of pulling to pushing exercises. Once that’s taken care of, use these exercises to keep you in the gym and out of my office for the long haul. Exercise #1: Face Pull The face pull may be the most versatile loaded training tool in our arsenal for remediating poor shoulder and thoracic positioning. It provides the exact opposite movements that we’re continuously pulled into on a daily basis. This movement incorporates humeral horizontal abduction and external rotation of the shoulder and retracts the shoulder blades – all helping combat the hunched over, constantly...

Beer and Rocks with Matt Vincent...

Matt Vincent is one of the most interesting humans I’ve had the privilege of meeting.  He is a 2x Highland Games World Champion, which basically means he’s the best in the world at throwing a bunch of heavy shit. One of the biggest takeaways for me out of this interview was the emphasis on staying healthy for his actual sport-throwing.  He repeatedly emphasized the fact that the training in the gym is only a small part of his overall training.  It is only there to support his technical work with throwing. With that said, he shares how he breaks down the year, what exercises he uses, how he recovers and prevents injury etc. He also goes into how he lost 30+ lbs. of fat and is still hitting PRs in the gym and on the field. When he’s not power snatching 330lbs or out training in the field, he enjoys a wide variety of art, craft beer, and even paints his toe-nails. This dude’s perspective on life is absolutely inspiring to me.  On one hand, he is in constant pursuit of excellence in the form of Highland Games’ competition.  On the flip-side, he has a great ability to balance that with time spent just having fun and enjoying his life.  I hope you enjoy the show....

Andrew Hawkins

Andrew Hawkins may not be the BEST receiver in the NFL, but we DARE you to find someone with BETTER...

THE JOINT-BY-JOINT APPROACH Apr22

THE JOINT-BY-JOINT APPROACH...

THE JOINT-BY-JOINT APPROACH Michael Boyle Excerpted with permission from Advances in Functional Training: Training Techniques for Coaches, Personal Trainers and Athletes If you are not yet familiar with the joint-by-joint theory, be prepared to take a quantum leap in thought process. My good friend, physical therapist Gray Cook has a gift for simplifying complex topics. In a conversation about the effect of training on the body, Gray produced one of the most lucid ideas I have ever heard. We were discussing the findings of his Functional Movement Screen (FMS), the needs of the different joints of the body and how the function of the joints relate to training. One beauty of the FMS is it allows us to distinguish between issues of stability and those of mobility; Gray’s thoughts led me to realize the future of training may be a joint-by-joint approach, rather than a movement-based approach. His analysis of the body is a straightforward one. In his mind, the body is a just a stack of joints. Each joint or series of joints has a specific function and is prone to predictable levels of dysfunction. As a result, each joint has particular training needs. This joint-by-joint idea has really taken on a life of its own, one I certainly didn’t envision. It seems like everyone’s familiar with it; it’s become so common knowledge people fail to reference Gray Cook or me as the developers of the idea. The table in the next column looks at the body on a joint-by-joint basis from the bottom up. The first thing you should notice is the joints alternate between mobility and stability. The ankle needs increased mobility, and the knee needs increased stability. As we move up the body, it becomes apparent the hip needs mobility....